‘The Earl’s Wager’ by Rebecca Thomas

tew rtSTORY: When straight laced earl, Will Sutton, is challenged to turn the obstinate American ward of his friend into a biddable lady suitable for the Marriage Mart, he gladly takes the wager. Then has to decide whether the prize–a prime racing stud horse–is worth changing the impudent beauty’s temperament he’s come to enjoy. Greatly.

One headstrong miss. One stuffy lord. One friendly wager. What could go wrong?

Will Sutton, the Earl of Grandleigh, believes he can save the family’s impoverished estate by investing in a racehorse, but the price is too steep. His brother-in-law offers him a deal: tutor his American ward in proper English customs, so she’ll be marriage material, and Will can have one of his horses. Maybe Miss Georgia Duvall prefers being a jockey, is obstinate and high spirited, but once she’s cleaned up and presentable, he’ll have no trouble finding her a quality suitor. She might even be quite pretty beneath the racetrack dust.

The last thing Georgia Duvall wants is to be married off to an English peer. But she won’t defy her father’s wishes, and sets her cap for the oldest lord she can find—a man who’ll die quickly and leave her alone to manage her inheritance. The Earl of Grandleigh might think he’ll teach her manners and marry her off to someone younger than eighty, but there hasn’t been an obstacle yet Georgia can’t overcome. Including a stuffy, overbearing English lord.

REVIEW: Will Sutton, the Earl of Grandleigh, has just returned from Ireland to visit his friend and brother-in-law, Oliver Westwyck, the Earl of Marsdale. Oliver is married to Will’s sister, Arabella, and the couple runs Autumn Ridge stud farm and racing stables. Oliver tells Will that he now has a American ward who has recently become an heiress. Oliver adds that she is quite a hellion. He is responsible for seeing that she is properly married. Since Arabella is soon to have a baby, they will not have time to do this themselves, thus they need Will’s help. Georgia Duval is 24 years old. Her parents have passed away and her father’s wish was for her to marry and live in England, the country of her mother’s birth. Georgia is not happy about this because she loves America.

When it turns out that Georgia filled in for a jokey who had taken ill and subsequently won a race, every one of the family is surprised. Will’s objection to her racing is quite obvious and Georgia decides that he is the most pompous peer she has ever met. But when she learns that Oliver has requested that Will oversee finding a match for her in London, she is furious. Will informs her than she will receive instruction in English manners and customs. In addition, she cannot access the fortune her father left her until she marries. Reluctantly, she agrees.

Georgia does not make it easy for Will to do his job because she teases him too much. He soon learns that she is not the ignorant miss he initially thought her to be. Naturally, their constant togetherness sparks an attraction.

Is Will going to be able to hold back his attraction? Is Georgia going to fall for him too?

This was a cute plot with some humor thrown in. I found it difficult to believe that Will would be allowed to be alone with Georgia like he was if he was supposed to be teaching her the rules of propriety.

Complimentary copy provided by the publisher

Connie for b2b

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About Bookworm

I'm married, working, and have grown and independent kids. I love gardening, reading and painting. My favorite TV show is Dancing With the Stars! Television shows have gone to the crap house. My favorite movie of all time is "Last of the Mohicans" with Daniel Day Lewis. Second best is "Titanic" and third "Passion of the Christ". I am an avid reader and I love talking about the books I’ve read, especially romance novels. I will warn you though: I am prone to rants and raves about a lot of things!

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