‘My American Duchess’ by Eloisa James

mad ejSTORY: The arrogant Duke of Trent intends to marry a well-bred Englishwoman. The last woman he would ever consider marrying is the adventuresome Merry Pelford— an American heiress who has infamously jilted two fiancés.

But after one provocative encounter with the captivating Merry, Trent desires her more than any woman he has ever met. He is determined to have her as his wife, no matter what it takes. And Trent is a man who always gets what he wants.

The problem is, Merry is already betrothed, and the former runaway bride has vowed to make it all the way to the altar. As honor clashes with irresistible passion, Trent realizes the stakes are higher than anyone could have imagined. In his battle to save Merry and win her heart, one thing becomes clear:

All’s fair in love and war.

REVIEW: London – 1803

Miss Merry Pelford is a lovely, young American woman. Having lost her parents at a young age, she has been brought up in Boston by her loving aunt and uncle. A wealthy young woman, she has now come to London in search of a husband. She has been engaged twice before, but both relationships ended quickly. It appears that Merry realized that she just did not truly love these men.

The Duke of Trent inherited his title some years when his parents were killed in a carriage accident. His dedication to duty and running of his estates consumes his time. While he realizes that one day he will have to marry, he is in no hurry to do so. He knows that he has yet to meet the perfect woman who will challenge him intelligently instead of the usual retinue of missish young ladies he encounters at soirees. He is also quite concerned about his younger twin brother, Cedric. The man spends too much money and is, quite simply, a drunk. He is good at concealing it from the public. He acts rather normal when out in society, but becomes very drunk when he returns home every night. Trent has no patience with Cedric’s heavy alcohol consumption as his father had been drinking when he was driving the carriage when their fatal accident occurred.

Just now, Lord Cedric Allardyce has asked for Merry Pelford’s hand in marriage. The man is quite handsome, well dressed, and full of flowery language but she is unaware of the person he really is. He realizes that she is a very rich heiress and he lusts after her money. Merry is quite smitten with him and accepts. But before the engagement can be announced, Merry meets another man the same evening with whom she has a delightful conversation and to whom she is attracted. He is none other than the Duke of Trent. They don’t know one another’s names at the time they converse. The Duke is so taken with Merry that he decides he wants to learn her name and is sure that she is the one he wants to marry. When he sees her later, he is shocked to find that she had earlier agreed to marry Cedric and she realizes that once again, she has been very foolish and said yes to a proposal when she shouldn’t have.

We see how the attraction between Merry and Trent has caught fire and just cannot be denied. But Cedric shows his true colors with the threats he makes to Merry if she tries to call off the engagement. She has no other choice but to go through with the wedding.

How can Merry stand to live with a man as evil as Cedric?

This is where the story gets interesting. I liked Merry very much. Her American ways and her intelligence are refreshing and fun. Trent has not known any love from his parents in his life so he doesn’t know what love is. How can he find happiness in his life? Cedric is portrayed perfectly as the evil, jealous twin. However, I can’t help but hope he has a comeuppance in his future that will help him mend his ways. Trent was hard to like. I felt like Merry gives it all in the story and Trent just takes. But maybe I’m wrong. Do read this book and be sure to write a review with your opinion.

Connie for b2b

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